© 2007 - 2020 by LOMINA A.G.

  • Facebook LOMINA
  • YouTube LOMINA

PROTON EXCHANGE FUEL CELL PEM

The proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) uses a water-based, acidic polymer membrane as its electrolyte, with platinum-based electrodes. PEMFC cells operate at relatively low temperatures (below 100 degrees Celsius) and can tailor electrical output to meet dynamic power requirements. Due to the relatively low temperatures and the use of precious metal-based electrodes, these cells must operate on pure hydrogen. PEMFC cells are currently the leading technology for light duty vehicles and materials handling vehicles, and to a lesser extent for stationary and other applications. The PEMFC fuel cell is also sometimes called a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (also PEMFC).

Hydrogen fuel is processed at the anode where electrons are separated from protons on the surface of a platinum-based catalyst. The protons pass through the membrane to the cathode side of the cell while the electrons travel in an external circuit, generating the electrical output of the cell. On the cathode side, another precious metal electrode combines the protons and electrons with oxygen to produce water, which is expelled as the only waste product; oxygen can be provided in a purified form, or extracted at the electrode directly from the air.

 

PEMFC and AFC (Alkaline) are basically very similar but there are significant chemical and construction differences.

In real life PEM Fuel Cells are more efficient than AFCs but when it comes to electrolyzer H2 production is much better with Alkaline cell staks. Simple comparison follows:

PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE STAK

ALKALINE EXCHANGE MEMBRANESTAK

COMPARISON OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING PEM AND ALE